Members’ Websites

A selection of members’ sites to provide a flavour of our diverse interests.

  • attwoollassociates.com – David Attwoll writes poetry, is Chair of Liverpool University Press; and member of The Publishing Industry Advisory Board for Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies, Oxford Brookes University
  • www.amandahellberg.com – Amanda Hellberg, originally from Sweden, moved to England in 2000 to finish her MA at the University of Sussex. Now living in Oxford, she works as a writer and children’s book illustrator. Her website presents a portfolio of her work as an illustrator.
  • anitamathias.com – In Wandering Between Two Worlds, Anita Mathias writes of her Catholic childhood in Jamshedpur, India, her large, eccentric, extended family in Mangalore, her rebellion and atheism as a teenager in a Himalayan convent and her conversion and entry as a novice into Mother Teresa’s order in Calcutta.
  • barbaralornahudson.wordpress.com – Barbara Lorna Hudson, retired academic, social worker and author of books on social work, now writes fiction.
  • www.daphnehampson.co.uk – Daphne Hampson is a retired theologian who works in theology, Continental philosophy and feminist theory. In 2013 she published Kierkegaard: Exposition & Critique to mark the bicentenary of Kierkegaard’s birth. She is now working on a book on philosophy of religion in the Enlightenment and early nineteenth century.
  • darcyvallance.com – D’Arcy Adrian-Vallance writes digital, print, audio and video materials for learners of English worldwide, especially Middle-East. Also self-publishes and manages projects for other ELT publishers.
  • davidolsenpoetry.net – David Olsen’s Unfolding Origami won the Cinnamon Press Poetry Collection Award. He was formerly an energy economist, management consultant, and performing arts critic.
  • day-books.com – Edward Fenton, who was editor of The Oxford Writer from February 2005 until February 2009, is both an author and a publisher. He specialises in rescuing diaries of historical note and publishing or re-publishing them. His website documents the results of this unusual publishing enterprise.
  • dennishamley.com – Dennis Hamley writes children’s and young adult books, including The War and Freddy, Andre Deutsch 1991 (Smarties shortlist); Out of the Mouths of Babes, Scholastic 1997; Ellen’s People, Walker Books 2006. he took over the editorship of The Oxford Writer in 2009.
  • donnadickenson.net – Donna Dickenson describes herself on her new website as an ‘author, activist and academic’ – in that order. She holds a chair in law and philosophy at Birkbeck College, has a particular interest in the stem cell debate, and has written critical biographies of Emily Dickinson and George Sand.
  • embarrassingproblems.com – Margaret Stearn is a doctor and medical writer who also edits a clinical journal. She is the author of Embarrassing Problems (1988) which has recently been expanded and reissued under the title The Must-Have Health Guide (2005). This is the website of the book.
  • frankegerton.com – Frank Egerton is a literary journalist and author of the novel The Lock. Frank was until 2003 the editor of The Oxford Writer, the newsletter of Writers in Oxford. He reviews regularly for The Times. He also works part-time as a library cataloguer at the Oxford Union.
  • georginaferry.com – Georgina Ferry is a former New Scientist writer and contributor to BBC Radio 4’s Science Now. Her first book was a biography of Dorothy Hodgkin. In the Guardian review of her latest book, a biography of Max Perutz, Giles Foden wrote that ‘Georgina Ferry . . . is rapidly turning into the most interesting science writer going’.
  • hughmcmanners.com – Hugh McManners writes on military subjects, contemporary history, world politics and outdoor activities. A veteran of the Falklands War and former Sunday Times defence correspondent, he is now Director of The Oxford University Scars of War Foundation and also persists as a singer-songwriter-guitarist fronting the Bash Band.
  • janeowen.co.uk – Jane Owen, the Times Online garden correspondent, presented Gardens Through Time with Diarmuid Gavin, on BBC2. Her book of the series is published by BBC Worldwide. She currently writes a gardening blog for the Times.
  • jane-robinson.com – Jane Robinson’s first book, Wayward Travellers, offered an anecdote-rich guide to 400 women travellers; her most recent book was Mary Seacole, a biography of the charismatic black nurse of the Crimea who was called ‘a heroine’ by The Times and ‘a brothel-keeping quack’ by Florence Nightingale.
  • janiehampton.co.uk Janie Hampton is the author of fifteen books. She has been a journalist in Africa, a producer at the BBC World Service, has worked for The Arvon Foundation and, as part of the Year of the Artist in 2001, she was the first Arts Council sponsored writer-in-residence in a pub. Her books include The Austerity Olympics: the London Games in 1948 and How the Girl Guides Won the War.
  • joannakenrick.com – Joanna Kenrick’s Moondance, a picture book for children, was published in 2004. Since then she has had four more books published. The most recent, Red Tears, is a novel for teenagers about cutting and self-harm which was published by Faber in 2007. ‘And no, before you ask,’ she writes on her website, ‘I have never self-harmed . . .’
  • juliacresswell.info – Julia Cresswell is the author of over a dozen books all of which are connected with the history and development of words and languages or where our ideas come from.
  • juliesummers.co.uk – Julie Summers is a biographer and historian, whose latest book looks behind the myth created by Bridge on the River Kwai in order to tell the true story behind the film. Julie is the former chair of Writers in Oxford.
  • literascribe.blogspot.com – Lorna Fergusson, whose first novel, The Chase, was published by Bloomsbury, spends some of her time teaching creative writing. One of her students suggested that she should take to blogging and she did. literascribe – ‘a writer’s take on the business of books and the writing life’ is the result.
  • www.marcusferrar.org and www.thebudapesthouse.com – Marcus Ferrar, a former Reuters correspondent, writes historical memoirs about Europe, World War II and the Cold War, including A Foot In Both Camps: a German Past For Better and For Worse (2012) and The Budapest House: a Life re-Discovered (2013). Forthcoming: The Fight For Freedom.
  • malcolmpryce.com Malcolm Pryce spent his childhood in Aberystwyth. He worked for a year on BMW’s production line before reading German at Warwick University and becoming ‘the world’s worst aluminium salesman’. After being fired he became by turns a copywriter in London, a South Seas deckhand and an Asian vagabond before writing his first crime novel, Aberystwyth Mon Amour. Click for the full version of his potted biography.
  • margaretpelling.co.uk – Margaret Pelling came to Oxford from a Cardiff council estate in the 1960s to read physics. She met and married a classicist who is now the Regius Professor of Greek, abandoned research astrophysics and became a civil servant in Whitehall. In her late 40s, her imagination was rekindled by her ten-year-old daughter and she began to write fiction ‘under the desk’. In 2005, her first novel, Work for Four Hands, was published.
  • megankerr.co.uk – Megan Kerr describes herself as a ‘writer and ghostwriter, a poet, an amateur photographer, a sometime academic, and a closet geek’. The website she recently built for herself is a glorious feast of colour. It is also ingenious, including a free database for writers, which is designed to write your letters, suggest publishers and calculate your tax (together with much else).
  • michaelgross.co.uk – Michael Gross is a science writer in residence at the School of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, London and author of general science books such as Life on the Edge (1998) and Travels to the Nanoworld (1999).
  • mikephilbin1966.wix.com/freeplanetvswarworld – Mike Philbin’s first published short story appeared in New York in 1985. His first novel, Red Hedz, was published by the Creation Press in 1990. He describes himself as a psycho-erotic writer and says: ‘I detest the mainstream. I cannot understand how such Franchise Writing can satisfy the creative needs of the writer.’
  • newberyandengland.com – Elizabeth Newbery specialises in writing and producing museum guides for children. The guide she produced recently for the Tower of London, Tower Power, won the Best Museum Publication Award for 2005.
  • philip-pullman.com – Philip Pullman was a founder member of WiO and for several years designed the newsletter. The site listed here is Philip’s own. But there are many Pullman sites, one of the best of which is bridgetothestars.net
  • reneeholler.com – Born in Würzburg, Renée Holler moved to Munich when she was eight, discovered Enid Blyton and resolved to become an author and a detective. She hasn’t yet achieved the second ambition but has written a series of historical thrillers for children as well as non-fiction books about marbles, tops and babies. Her website (like her books) is in German.
  • ritacarter.co.uk – Rita Carter is the author of the internationally bestselling book on the workings of the human brain, Mapping the Mind and, more recently of Consciousness. Her new book, Multiplicity, will be published in 2008. Check out the articles page of her website to test whether you suffer from gorilla blindness.
  • rudebritain.co.uk – The site set up by WiO member Rob Bailey and his co-author Ed Hurst to help publicise their book about British place names.
  • samjordison.blogspot.com – Sam Jordison is the author of Crap Towns (which includes an interesting entry on Oxford) and The Joy of Sects. This is his website.
  • satin.demon.co.uk – Rob Walters began his writing career as an author of technical books about computer telephony and related subjects. He is now branching out in other directions as can be seen from the writing page of his website.
  • www.thewhiterock.co.ukAn Explorer’s World: Hugh Thomson is the author of autobiographical travel books for Weidenfeld & Nicolson: The White Rock, Nanda Devi, Cochineal Red: Travels through Ancient Peru and Tequila Oil. In 2012 Random House published The Green Road into the Trees: An Exploration of England, in which Hugh for the first time writes about his own country. His blog follows his travels.
  • thinking-big.co.uk – Stephen Law is a drummer, a mountaineer, a university lecturer and the author of The Philosophy Gym and The Philosophy Files. He has a particular interest in children’s philosophy and critical thinking. This is the website he has set up with fellow philosopher, Nigel Warburton.
  • trevormostyn.com – Having hitch-hiked to India and Afghanistan in 1965, Trevor Mostyn became a provincial journalist in England before reading Arabic and Persian at Edinburgh University. Ever since he has worked as a journalist and consultant specialising in the Middle East. He was recently made senior adviser to the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism in Oxford.